Barn Wood Siding

Come home to siding as rich in character as it is in history. We specialize in only high quality reclaimed barn wood siding that can be custom milled in-house to complement the interiors and exteriors of high-end architecture.

Discover the styles we have below and find the one that works best for your project.

Style Selection

Weathered Greys

Weathered Grey Reclaimed barn wood siding

Mixed Hardwoods

Mixed Hardwood Reclaimed barn wood siding

Reds

Red Reclaimed barn wood siding

Hand Hewn Slab

Hand Hewn Slab reclaimed barnwood siding

Brown Options

Brown Reclaimed Barn wood siding

Rusty Metal

Rusty Metal reclaimed barn wood siding

Weathered Grey

These boards were never painted, therefore surface hues matured while being exposed to the elements, resulting in shades ranging from silver to dark grey. When installed, the contrast of lighter versus darker hues creates a stylish and timeless look. These boards are rare and among our most popular options. 

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These boards were never painted, therefore surface hues matured while being exposed to the elements, resulting in shades ranging from silver to dark grey. When installed, the contrast of lighter versus darker hues creates a stylish and timeless look. These boards are rare and among our most popular options. 

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Weathered Grey Pine

As a softwood, grey pine is less dense and much lighter than grey hardwoods. Its weathering is slightly rough with shallow grooves and furrowing. Grain patterns are generally straight, giving it a rustic and modern appearance. Coloring tends to be lighter hues of greys and silvers when compared to hardwoods, although many pine boards range to dark grey. Pine comes in 8"-12" widths.

Weathered Grey Pine

As a softwood, grey pine is less dense and much lighter than grey hardwoods. Its weathering is slightly rough with shallow grooves and furrowing. Grain patterns are generally straight, giving it a rustic and modern appearance. Coloring tends to be lighter hues of greys and silvers when compared to hardwoods, although many pine boards range to dark grey. Pine comes in 8"-12" widths.

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Weathered Grey Hardwoods

Grey hardwoods are prized as a denser and heavier option with distinct grooves that are smooth to the touch. The natural hardness of these boards leads to weathering that brings out the natural spirals and waves of the grain patterns. Our ash, oak, elm, beech or maple are weathered with distinct groves, and may have darker shades of faded black paint from previous lives on a tobacco plantation. Tobacco drying houses were typically painted black to absorb as much heat from the sun as possible during the curing process. Boards are available in 4"-12" widths. 

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Mixed Hardwoods

There were times when a barn was built directly from the trees that grew on its foundation. Different species of trees were cut down, milled, and then used for its siding. When wood from these historic structures is reclaimed, it generally contains a mix of elm, ash, beech, and maple, which are rich with varying colors and grain patterns--a palette of weathered grey and brown barn boards suited to your project needs.
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Brown Options

The shades of brown barn siding boards range from gray-brown to rich chocolate. Coloration is the timeless result of natural wood tones acquiring agrarian patina over many decades spent protected from the elements on the interiors of historic barns. Wood species include pine and hardwoods such as oak, ash, elm, beech, and maple. Aside from color variation and wood species, the main difference between brown varieties is their surface texture, or whether they were originally rough sawn or smooth-planed.
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Rough sawn boards retain their original unweathered surface textures, which showcase well-preserved circular sawn, sash sawn, or band sawn marks. Smooth boards, such as our smooth brown pine option, were planed before their original installation. Boards such as the naily brown roof boards, with their nail patterns, have unique character that reflects their first life in the construction of historical barns. Explore the styles we have below.

Rough Sawn Brown

Varying between hues of rich to light brown, with elegant patina, these pine boards come from the interior of historic barns. They’re often accented by unique circle saw marks that accent original un-weathered surface textures.
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Smooth Brown

Originally a barn's interior surface, brown smooth siding boards were planed at an historic mill. These boards are aged with beautiful patina, and colors range between light to rich brown, with variations in each piece.
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Grey-brown Pine

These boards come from the interior of barns that stayed erect after their roofs were blown off. Originally brown and never exposed to the elements, grey-brown pine has been weathered more recently to include rich variations of brown and gray.
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Naily Roof Boards

These sheathing boards were hidden under metal roofs for decades and are characterized by distinct nail holes from periodic roof repairs and replacements during the course of the barn’s life. Rich chocolate patina adds additional sophistication to these unique boards that were never exposed to the elements.
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Mixed Oak

A mixture of reclaimed red and white oak barn siding that maintains a classic look over time, with similar grain patterns throughout and very tight growth rings. Most mixed oak boards naturally range from tan and gold to chocolate brown patina with accented handsome grain patterns. Widths range from 2" to 8".

Mixed Oak for Furniture Building: High quality barn siding that runs straight and has very little or zero knot holes, that has been set aside specifically for making furniture.

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Elm

Mature American elm are very rare in North America today due to the devastating effects of Dutch Elm Disease, which eliminated most of the elm population by the 1970s. For this reason, reclaimed structures, such as historic barns remain one of the few sources of old growth elm lumber.

Many prefer elm for its long, straight grain patters, light tan/beige to light to medium reddish-brown coloration, and resistance to splitting. It is often compared to oak and makes for excellent interior paneling, siding, or flooring

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Red Options

The tradition of painting barns red began as farmers sought ways to seal their structures from moss and fungal decay. Without the convenience of ready-made paint, farmers discovered that a blend of linseed oil, skimmed milk, lime, and rust would effectively protect their barns for many years. The color red comes from the key ingredient, rust (ferrous oxide).
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Faded Red

These boards are especially rich in character. They come from barns that were painted red in the past and then naturally faded over time. We have predominantly gray boards with red highlight, 50/50 gray-red blends, and mostly red boards with hints of grey. The hue mix depends on when the barn was painted last and also depends on the area of the barn where the board was positioned; areas of the barn that received high sun exposure faded quicker, whereas boards shaded by eaves maintained their red hues longer. Please include your preferences when you request a quote.

Faded Red

These boards are especially rich in character. They come from barns that were painted red in the past and then naturally faded over time. We have predominantly gray boards with red highlight, 50/50 gray-red blends, and mostly red boards with hints of grey. The hue mix depends on when the barn was painted last and also depends on the area of the barn where the board was positioned; areas of the barn that received high sun exposure faded quicker, whereas boards shaded by eaves maintained their red hues longer. Please include your preferences when you request a quote.
 

Red On Red

This material comes from the sides of historic barns that were painted relatively recently. Signs of weathering, color variances, and cracked paint give these boards timeless character. Available in 8” – 12” widths.
 

Douglas Fir

We mill siding and interior paneling from Douglas fir dimensional lumber (generally 3X material) or timbers. Most customers prefer to leave the untouched original rough sawn patina, but we also offer the option to surface plane the Douglas fir boards on all 4 sides (S4S). An S4S finish makes the boards look as if they were new, with the exception of any remaining nail or bolt holes from the lumber/timber's first life in an historic structure. The notable advantage to freshly milling reclaimed Douglas fir is that it clearly reveals the desirable old growth characteristics under the acquired patina.

 

Hand Hewn Slab

Are you looking for the look of a log cabin without actually building a log cabin? Hand hewn slab siding will provide you the appearance of a log home and is a very economical option compared to building an actual log home. The best face of a hand hewn beam is cut at 2-3” thick and then mounted to a framed wall. Chinking material is then added between the slabs giving the appearance of historic hand hewn squared log construction. From a building standpoint, it is much easier and cheaper to install utilities through a framed wall with hand hewn slab siding than through traditional log construction.
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Rusty Metal

Corrugated and v-notch patterned metal panels from the roofs of historic barns. Each section is aged with varying levels of rusty patina for a vibrant and unique palette for your project. For some fascinating information on how different kinds of chemical reactions created diverse coloring in our rusty metal siding, see this article on the meaning of varying levels of rust.
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If you've been on the fence, there has never been a better time. Let us help make your reclaimed wood project a reality.
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